Tuesday, February 28, 2012


  Five mother sauces defined

  • Béchamel, the classic white sauce, was named after its inventor, Louis XIV's steward Louis de Béchamel. The king of all sauces, it is often referred to as a cream sauce because of its appearance and is probably used most frequently in all types of dishes. Made by stirring milk into a butter-flour roux, the thickness of the sauce depends on the proportion of flour and butter to milk.

  • Velouté is a stock-based white sauce. It can be made from chicken, veal or fish stock. Enrichments such as egg yolks, mushrooms or cream are sometimes also added.

  • Espagnole, or brown sauce, is traditionally made of a rich meat stock, a mirepoix of browned vegetables (most often a mixture of diced onion, carrots and celery), a nicely browned roux, herbs and sometimes tomato paste.The modern version is referred to as natural reduction it contains no roux and is reduced to achiebe it's consistency.We will discuss THIS METHOD at length in the future.

  • Hollandaise and Mayonnaise are two sauces that are made with an emulsion of egg yolks and fat. Hollandaise is made with butter, egg yolks and lemon juice, usually in a double boiler to prevent overheating, and served warm. It is generally used to embellish vegetables, fish and egg dishes, such as the classic Eggs Benedict. Mayonnaise is a thick, creamy dressing that's an emulsion of vegetable oil, egg yolks, lemon juice or vinegar and seasonings. It is widely used as a spread, a dressing and as a sauce. It's also used as the base for such mixtures as Tartar Sauce, Thousand Island Dressing, Aïoli, and Remoulade.

  • Tomato -tomate sauce of classical French cooking, as codified by Auguste Escoffier, consists of salt belly of pork, onions, bay leaves, thyme, tomato purée or fresh tomatoes, roux, garlic, salt, sugar, and pepper. Note:You can substitute pork with anchovy, roux can be eliminated as well… a great addition is celery and carrot.